Category Archives: Healthy Eating

GRILLED HALIBUT WITH CHERRY TOMATOES

More Awesome Grilled protein ideas!

Grilled fish—what could be better? Not only is halibut chock-full of protein, but it’s also a great source of those awesome Omega 3 fatty acids that seem to be missing from most of our diets. Top the halibut with your favorite herbs for a tasty treat.

I like to grill a little (or a lot) extra every time so my wife and I have leftovers throughout the week. This helps with planning our meals so I am prepped and ready and don’t have any excuses to grab junk.

Happy Grilling!

Ingredients
Directions
  1. Light grill.
  2. Brush fish with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
  3. Place fish and sliced tomatoes on grill.
  4. Cook fish about 4 minutes each side, or until thoroughly cooked. When finished, tomatoes will be slightly charred.
  5. Top fish with tomatoes, fresh herbs, and a squeeze of lemon.
NUTRITION FACTS
Recipe yields 1 serving
Calories 205
Total Fat 10 g
Total Carb 6 g
Protein 25 g

GRILLED STEAK, ONION, AND MUSHROOM ARUGULA SALAD

It’s summer, which means it’s time to fire up your barbecue and get grilling! Grilling is quick, doesn’t leave many dishes, makes cooking for a crowd easy, and produces phenomenal food. Even better, grilling is one of the leanest ways to cook meat. I am a grill phenatic and even grill in the winter as the pic below shows.  I not only love the flavor but it’s a great lean and mean way to cook!

There’s no need to fall off your diet during the summer months. Instead, grab some lean protein and veggies, and throw them on a sizzling barbecue. Here are one of my favorite grill recipes that will bring mouthfuls of flavor and zest to your clean-eating spring and summer. Enjoy!

 GRILLED STEAK, ONION, AND MUSHROOM ARUGULA SALAD

Need a low-carb, high-protein meal? Say no more! With this steak salad, you’ll get all the protein you want without all the carbs. The arugula will also provide a big hit of vitamins A, K, and Folate as well as some Calcium and Potassium. The best part, however, is the yummy Asian-inspired flavor!

If I want carbs in this meal, I grill some red potatoes or yams to go with it. Remember, don’t skip carbs all the time. Your body needs them for energy, just stick with complex carbs…

2012-12-15 17.03.24

 

Ingredients
Directions
  1. In a large Ziploc bag, combine garlic powder, onion powder, ginger, chili powder, paprika, cayenne pepper, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Shake thoroughly to mix well.
  2. Add flank steak to bag and make sure rub thoroughly covers steak. Allow to marinate for 15 minutes.
  3. Place sliced onions and mushrooms in bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Let marinade.
  4. Heat up grill.
  5. Grill steak to desired temperature. Place veggies on grill for about 5-10 minutes, or until caramelized.
  6. Top arugula with veggies, sliced steak, and drizzle with balsamic vinegar. Don’t forget to cut flank, cross grain for tender slices.
 Recipe thanks to http://www.Bodybuilding.com

 

Keeping Fit over 40 and understanding dangerous visceral fat

If you miss the days when you could buckle down on diet and exercise to drop a few unwanted pounds within a reasonably quick period of time, you’re not alone. Older adults, especially women, face physiological changes that can promote weight gain and, even worse, muscle loss.  I know, Talk about a midlife crisis.

Once women reach 40, their likelihood of becoming overweight or obese sharply rises. In fact, about 68 percent of women aged 40 to 59 are overweight or obese–a 17 percent increase compared to women between the ages of 20 and 39–according to data from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)). Hormonal changes may be to blame, researchers suggest.

Everyone has some subcutaneous fat but the dangerous fat is the visceral fat that hides in-between your organs. Visceral or “deep” fat wraps around the inner organs and spells trouble for your health. How do you know if you have it? If you have a large waist or belly, of course you have some visceral fat but if your stomach protrudes and is tight too the touch, it could be a sign of visceral fat. Visceral fat drives up your risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and even dementia.

Visceral fat is thought to play a larger role in insulin resistance which boosts risk of diabetes more than other fat.  It’s not clear why, but it could explain or partially explain why visceral fat is a bigger health risk.

A large study conducted by the International Menopause Society found that hormonal changes in women alter the way the body distributes fat in the body, making it more likely to accumulate in the abdomen as visceral fat. Visceral fat worsens existing  hormonal changes by acting as an endocrine organ itself, pumping out hormone-like compounds that increase inflammation and the risk of insulin resistance related to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Another study from the Mayo Clinic investigated what was going on at the cellular level during menopause by comparing fat tissue of pre- and post-menopausal women. They found the two enzymes that work to produce and store fat were more active in the postmenopausal women, increasing their risk of having a higher body fat percentage (3).

How to battle the middle-aged spread?

Exercise intensely. Engaging in exercise, especially resistance training at high intensity, helps stimulate muscle growth, which in turn boosts metabolism and burns fat. Studies show that physically active women who enter menopause are leaner than sedentary women and have a decreased risk of developing metabolic disease (4).  What’s more, postmenopausal women who exercise daily maintain their weight while those who have lower activity levels have been found to have increased body fat, mostly around the midsection (5).

Eat a balanced, protein-rich diet. What you eat can also influence midlife weight gain. A study with 17,000 postmenopausal women assigned to either a control or a diet group (who were encouraged to eat healthy, balanced meals) found that those in the diet group had less severe menopause symptoms and were three times more likely to have lost weight (6).

A diet lacking essential nutrients and high in refined carbohydrates and empty calories will accelerate the aging process including age-related weight gain. Instead, eating a balanced diet with the right amounts of high-quality protein  can stimulate muscle synthesis and boost metabolism, turning the scale in your favor.

Hold on to muscle. Loss of muscle is a common result of the aging process with women losing about 1 percent of their lean body mass per year after age 40 if they aren’t physically active (7). Because muscle is more metabolically active than fat, a muscular body composition burns more calories and uses fat tissue for fuel rather than stored energy. Eating a protein-rich diet and engaging in muscle-building exercise helps establish a healthy balance of fat and lean body tissue in the body.

Get quality sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, up to 61 percent of postmenopausal women have issues with falling asleep or getting enough quality sleep most nights . A major reason for this loss of sleep is due to instances of hot flashes. Hot flashes can disrupt sleep because body temperature drastically increases, leading to discomfort and waking. Consequently, lack of sleep has been associated with increased levels of the hunger hormone, ghrelin, and decreased levels of the satiety hormone, leptin, leading to overeating and weight gain.

To improve sleep quality, it’s best to avoid caffeinated beverages before bedtime, follow a regular sleep routine, and exercise during the day. If sleep issues still persist, it’s best to see your doctor for further guidance.

Make sure to get enough fiber. Middle-aged women commonly face gastrointestinal changes caused by fluctuations in hormones that lead to bloating and sluggish intestines. These feelings can affect appetite and energy level–two important aspects of staying on track with diet and exercise goals. To support bowel health, drink plenty of water throughout the day and eat sufficient amounts of fiber. In addition to getting fiber from whole grains, beans, fresh fruits and vegetables, supplement your diet with extra fiber to reach the recommended 25 grams per day.

While there may be additional challenges when trying to lose weight midlife , sites like www.SummerBodyNow.com can provide you with the tools to alter your lifestyle and reach your weight-loss goals. They specialize in coaching over 40 men and women through diet and exercise programs individually designed for  your unique situation and body type.

Take your health into your own hands and make 40 and above feel like 30 all over again.

References

  1. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Curtin LR, et al. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States, 1999–2004. JAMA. 2006;295(13):1549-1555.
  2. Davis SR, Castelo-Branco C, Chedraui, et al. Understanding weight gain and menopause.Climacteric. 2012;15(5):419-29.
  3. Santosa S, Jensen MD. Adipocyte fatty acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women. Diabetes. 2013;62(3):775-82.
  4. Sternfeld B, Dugan S. Physical activity and health during the menopausal transition. Obset Gynecol Clin North Am. 2011;38(3):537-566.
  5. Sternfeld B, Wang H, Quesenberry CP Jr, et al. Physical activity and changes in weight and waist circumference in midlife women: findings from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation.Am J Epidemiol. 2004;160(9):912-922.
  6. Kroenkw CH, Cann BJ, Stefanick ML, et al. Effects of a dietary intervention and weight change on vasomotor symptoms in the Women’s Health Initiative. Menopuase. 2012;19(9):980-8.
  7. Paddon-Jones D. Lean body mass loss with age. Abbott Nutrition websitehttp://images.abbottnutrition.com/ANHI2010/MEDIA/14-110th AN Conf Paddon-Jones Final.pdf. Accessed march 31, 2014.
  8. Menopause and sleep. National Sleep Foundation website.http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/sleep-topics/menopause-and-sleep. Accessed March 31, 2014.
  9. Heitkemper MM, Chang L. Do fluctuations in ovarian hormones affect gastrointestinal symptoms in women with irritable bowel syndrome? Gend Med. 2009;6 Suppl 2:152-167.

DOES YOUR MEAL REPLACEMENT BAR MEET THE TEST?

With so many meal replacement and protein bars on the market it can be hard to tell which one provides the best quality nutrition.

I use meal replacement bars and also recommend them to my clients, especially if they travel. It is one of the quickest and easiest ways to replace a healthy meal, on the run.  My first choice is always real food, second a meal replacement shake and third a high protein, nutrient dense meal replacement bar.

Most bars are either nutritionally unbalanced—not containing the right quantities of protein, carbohydrate, and fats to qualify as a meal replacement—and often are artificially sweetened, flavored, and colored.

Choosing a meal replacement bar can be overwhelming because there are so many claiming to have the perfect nutritional profile. A true meal replacement bar has all the protein, complex carbs, healthy fats, enzymes and nutrients of a perfectly balanced meal.

To help inform choices (and filter out the scams), here are five things to look for in a meal replacement bar.

  1. Low-glycemic – Carbohydrates in the form of starches and sugars are critical to deliver the body a steady source of energy for a longer period of time. But foods that are high glycemic—meaning they’re fast-absorbing sugars and/or they don’t provide much protein, fat, or fiber in addition to the carbohydrates—are known to cause a spike in blood sugar, which can be followed closely by a crash, and then hunger. Low-glycemic bars ensure a steady source of energy to keep you feeling full longer.
  2. Whey protein – The type of protein used in meal replacement bars matters in a big way. Whey is shown to promote more satiety and fat loss than any other kind of protein, and when paired with exercise, promotes muscle growth (1). Whey protein in its most natural and unprocessed form is described as undenatured. Research has shown that the consumption of undenatured whey protein has antioxidant effects beneficial for overall health (2).
  3. Maximum nutrition, minimum calories – As a meal replacement, bars should provide the nutrition normally consumed in a healthy, balanced meal. That ought to include carbohydrates, fats, and protein, but in a fraction of the calories. Carbohydrates and fats have earned a bad reputation, when in reality they are vital to the body’s ability to function. When looking for a bar, choose one that contains healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, natural sugars, fiber, and an ample amount of high-quality protein. Some bars are too high in calories while others are too low. A healthy meal replacement bar should contain around 200 to 300 calories—still promoting weight loss, but not sacrificing any nutrients or your energy levels.
  4. Satiety – Dieting is often associated with uncomfortable hunger that comes with cutting calories. In clinical trials, consuming a meal replacement bar has shown to curb appetite and lead to safe and sustained weight loss (3). When supplementing your diet with a low-calorie yet nutritious meal bar, cutting calories can be effortless and sustainable because your body is still being properly nourished. When meal replacement bars are filled with high-quality whey protein, they also have the benefit of providing increased satiety resulting in the consumption of fewer calories throughout the day (4). Fiber is also an important part of any diet to enhance gastrointestinal health and function and increase satiety.
  5. Quality – Not all health bars deliver what they claim to have in them. If the company doesn’t have an established no-compromise quality policy that involves rigorous testing, then its nutritional content could be off—by as much as 15 percent! That could mean extra calories you don’t realize you’re getting, usually from fat and sugar. Plus, if not clinically tested to be low-glycemic, you run the risk of blood sugar spikes that could thwart your health and weight-loss goals.

When you don’t have time to prepare a healthy balanced meal, instead of settling for bars that are not necessarily healthy, I use Isagenix IsaLean Bars. They taste freaking Awesome, they’re well balanced and have the best protein to hold and gain muscle!

Possibly the best part about IsaLean Bars is their convenience. On the run or wherever you are that you can’t make an IsaLean Shake but need a healthy meal, IsaLean Bars are the answer.

References

  1. Acheson K, Blondel-Lubrano A, Oguey-Araymon S, et al. Protein choices targeting thermogenesis and metabolism. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(3):525-34.
  2. Bounous G and P Gold. The biological activity of undenatured dietary whey proteins: role of glutathione. Clin Invest Med Volume 1991;14:296-309.
  3. Rothacker DQ, Watemberg S. Short-term hunger intensity changes following ingestion of a meal replacement bar for weight control. Int J Food Sci Nutr 2004;55:223-6.
  4. Luhovyy BL, Akhavan T, Anderson GH. Whey proteins in the regulation of food intake and satiety. J Am Coll Nutr. 2007;26:704S–12S.

For optimum weight loss and muscle gain, make the most of your protein timing.

Do you want to build a strong, fit body? While pushing weights at the gym is key to building muscle and stimulating fat loss, what you eat—specifically protein—should be a priority.

Think of it this way: if your body isn’t supplied with the nutrients it needs for muscle recovery and energy replenishment, are you really getting the most out of your workout? The winning combination is when both diet and exercise are maximized to reach your health goals.

When it comes to making the most of protein, the key is to get the right kind, in the right amounts, at the right time.

Right Kind

Protein can be found in a variety of foods. Eggs, chicken, fish, dairy, and beef are all sources of protein. However, not all protein is created equal.

For a superior protein option, study after study shows nothing compares to whey protein. Whey has a high concentration of branched-chain amino acids (or BCAAs), which are quickly absorbed and used to build and repair muscle—especially if consumed after exercise.

Arguably the greatest benefit of consuming whey protein is the ability to maximize fat loss without losing muscle. A study comparing whey protein and soy protein found that subjects consuming whey had 62 percent more fat loss during 5 1⁄2 hours after a workout (1).

Another study looking at the effect of supplementing with whey protein, soy protein, or carbohydrate after workouts for a period of nine months found that those consuming whey had 55 percent more muscle gain than either soy or carbohydrate groups (2). In fact, those who consumed soy protein had similar muscle synthesis as those who ate carbohydrates alone. For fat burning and muscle growth, the kind of protein you choose matters.

Right Amount 

It’s becoming more evident that adults could significantly benefit from eating higher amounts of quality protein, especially when attempting to lose weight.

A recent study compared muscle synthesis in men and women who consumed controlled diets that provided three different amounts of protein: the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight, twice the U.S. RDA, and three times the RDA (3). Weight loss was induced by restricting total calories consumed and increasing daily exercise. After three weeks, those who consumed double or triple the RDA had greater muscle synthesis than those who consumed the RDA.

The authors of that study said that they believed that the RDA for protein should be based on a level to optimize health, not just to prevent deficiencies. Their data demonstrate that the current RDA wasn’t enough for sparing muscle mass during weight loss. More is key—around 1.2 to 1.8 grams per kilogram of body weight.

In addition to supporting muscle growth, higher protein diets have also been shown to increase satiety so you are less tempted to overeat at mealtime (4).

Right Time

Getting the right amount of protein each day is essential for keeping muscle in a constant building state (anabolic) rather than allowing muscle to be broken down and used for energy (catabolic). While the typical American diet does provide a fair amount of protein, it’s not distributed evenly throughout the day.

Most breakfast meals are low in protein (think bagels, pastries, and cereals), providing an average of 10 grams. (See graph below.) For many, lunch may consist of a sandwich or soup and provide around 15 or 20 grams of protein. Then, a massive 60 grams (such as a medium-sized steak) is often consumed at dinner. To keep the body in a constant building state and to support muscle growth, fat burning, and fullness, it’s best to eat around 20 to 40 grams of protein at each meal.

To investigate this theory, researchers compared two groups of people—one that consumed protein evenly throughout the day and one that skewed their protein intake more toward dinner (5). The “even” group consumed 30 grams of protein three times during the day while the “skewed” group ate about 10 grams at breakfast, 20 grams at lunch, and 60 grams at dinner. After just one week of following the diets, those in the even group had 25 percent greater muscle protein synthesis than the skewed group. The fascinating aspect of this study is that both groups consumed the same total amount of protein—90 grams—yet those who distributed protein consumption regularly throughout the day gained more muscle.

In addition to eating protein throughout the day, a key time to take advantage of the body’s muscle building ability is post-workout. After exercise, blood is rushing to your muscles. By consuming whey protein after exercise, it can be quickly absorbed by the small intestine, shuttled into the blood stream, and delivered to muscle tissue. Failing to consume protein after a workout is a missed opportunity to take advantage of all your hard work.

It’s not just about eating protein to get the results you want, it’s about getting the right kind, in the right amount, at the right time. That’s why I use organic, indentured whey protein from New-Zealand! Undenatured means that it still has all of the immune boosting properties and macronutrients that can be killed by high heat processing. Cheap whey is wasted in your gut as not all of it is utilized and then excreted. Use the best – Use proper timing – Make your whey work for you!

References 
  1. Acheson K, Blondel-Lubrano A, Oguey-Araymon S, et al. Protein choices targeting thermogenesis and metabolism. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(3):525-34.
  2. Pasiakos SM, Cao JJ, Margolis ER, et al. Effects of high-protein diets on fat-free mass and muscle protein synthesis following weight loss: a randomized control trial. FASEB. 2013;27(9):3837.
  3. Luhovyy BL, Akhavan T, Anderson GH. Whey proteins in the regulation of food intake and satiety. J Am Coll Nutr. 2007;26:704S–12S.
  4. Mamerow MM, Mettler JA, English KL et al. Dietary protein distribution positively influences 24-h muscle protein synthesis in health adults. J Nutr. 2014; E pub ahead of print.
  5. Paddon-Jones and Rasmussen, 2009
  6. http://www.isagenixhealth.net/make-the-most-of-protein/utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=healthmostofprotein051314%5B/embed%5D

Toxic chemicals in our organic bodies…

Yah, sounds pretty nasty right? Would you pour bleach on your houseplants? Toxic chemicals on your food before you eat it? Feed junk food to your $800 toy poodle? Give your children toxic medicine with toxic colors and flavors? Well, most of us do it every day and make excuses for it as we’re doing it…

Reading the label is one thing. After all we are all masters of excuses, whether it be talking bad about the neighbors or a family member to eating and drinking things that we know are bad for us, we have an excuse for everything!

If you had all of the raw ingredients in your lab to create all of the concoctions you ate and drank on a daily basis and you had to actually mix the potion, you might think differently…

Would you ad high fructose corn syrup to your children’s drinks or would you go sugar free and add aspartame, a known neurotoxin? Would you put chlorine and fluoride, also a well known neurotoxin, in your drinking water or take a bath or shower in it so it could soak into your body’s biggest organ, your skin? Would you add know corrosive and toxic chemicals to your snacks so they wouldn’t spoil? Would you spray your fruits and veggies with, again more nasty toxins that wreck your hormonal balance and attack your brain and central nervous system? Many of which are known to ad xenoestrogens to your diet (can you say man boobs?).

Of course you wouldn’t. But as long as someone else does it and it comes in a cool package or bottle and makes it easy for you, then we can come up with an excuse for it. Like, “well, I only do this when I’m in a hurry” and “It was convenient and I know it’s bad but just one won’t kill me”…

It’s truly amazing how we can read a label or a warning and still drink or eat these things, as long as someone else adulterates it for us. But if we had to put the chemicals into it ourselves, we would think twice before consuming it.

Educate yourself on everything that you consume. These things don’t just go into your body and act as fuel or burn themselves off. They actually become a part of you!

Your body rejuvenates cells at an alarming rate. Everyone has heard that your body is constantly renewing itself and about every 7 years most of your body will have completely rebuilt itself out of new cells. Your body needs building blocks to build new cells and the building blocks are made up of what you consume… What you eat, drink and breath rapidly becomes you!

So the next time you reach for packaged or canned food, ask yourself if you want any of those chemicals to be integrated into your cellular structure… Yes, that might have tasted great and entertained your taste buds for a few minutes but now you are stuck with it in your cellular design for days or even years. I hope you enjoyed that doughnut because it just became part of you…

“Amino Sweet”, just another name for the poison Aspartame…

Artificial sweeteners -The drum has been beaten for quite some time on the dangers of artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose (Splenda), but that hasn’t stopped many people from consuming the products that contain it. It is found in diet sodas, yogurt, chewing gum, cooking sauces, tabletop sweeteners, flavored water, cereals, and sugar free products. Aspartame is combination of chemicals, namely aspartic acid (an amino acid with excitatory effects on brain cells), methanol and phenylalanine and scientists are placing it at the higher end of the range of what is considered toxic. Ninety different symptoms have been documented as a result of aspartame consumption, including anxiety attacks, slurred speech, fatigue, depression, migraines, tinnitus, vertigo, heart palpitations, nausea, and muscle spasms.

Aspartame’s presence in the world’s food supply has been the subject of great protest and controversy since the mid-1980′s when then CEO of Searle, Donald Rumsfeld, pushed for it’s approval to be sold on the market. As you may or may not remember, Mr. Rumsfeld went on to become George W. Bush’s Secretary of Defense. But aside from Aspartame’s availability on the market proving, once again, the ease in which someone could take advantage of the Crony-Capitalist door that links Government and corporations, Aspartame has been consistently proven to harm whoever, or whatever, consumes it. Please read the following article about the Aspartame Coverup!

http://www.naturalcuresnotmedicine.com/2014/03/aspartame-re-branded-aminosweet-next-chapter-aspartames-dangerous-history.html

Other sources for this article include: 

http://www.healingthebody.ca/http://www.naturalnews.com/034209_GMOs_questions.html